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Teaching tips

how i can teach the silent letters esp high school students

I’m not sure how important it is for you to teach silent letters. Back when I was teaching English-as-a-Second-Language, we did not worry much about them. What we emphasized was the way that words consist of prefixes, bases, and suffixes that appear in several different words. For instance, the base sign appears in words like sign, signal, design, designate. Although its pronunciation changes from one word to another (and although sometimes the <g> is silent), the changes are no problem so long as the students recognize the common base spelled <sign>. In the same way, if they learned to recognize the suffix -ed that marks past tense, the fact that the <e> is silent in words like boomed and toed was not a problem

The one type of silent letter that we did teach to them was the silent final <e> that serves some function like marking long vowels or soft <c> or <g> – as in mate, rice, ounce, urge, rage, etc.

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cummings, spell, spelling, english, words, spellers, teachers, reading, read, reader