A site for spellers, teachers of spelling and reading, and students of english words
cummings, spell, spelling, english, words, spellers, teachers, reading, read, reader cummings, spell, spelling, english, words, spellers, teachers, reading, read, reader cummings, spell, spelling, english, words, spellers, teachers, reading, read, reader
cummings, spell, spelling, english, words, spellers, teachers, reading, read, reader cummings, spell, spelling, english, words, spellers, teachers, reading, read, reader
 
cummings, spell, spelling, english, words, spellers, teachers, reading, read, reader cummings, spell, spelling, english, words, spellers, teachers, reading, read, reader

Questions and Answers

>> Search questions and answers

Keyword or phrase:   
Topic: 
     or view all answers

Teaching tips

Can I have a list of adjectives ending in -ly? There are some rules for stressing words such as VC#, VCC, VCLe+ W and so on. Can I have some information in detail? Thank you.

The analysis of the 129,000+ words in the Lexis database recognizes two -ly suffixes that form adjectives. (The third, most common, -ly] forms adverbs from adjectives.) The suffix -ly]2 forms adjectives of time from nouns of time: biannually, bimonthly, biquarterly, biweekly, biyearly, daily, dailyness, fortnightly, hourly, midweekly, momently, monthly, newsweekly, nightly, quarterly, semimonthly, semiweekly, semiyearly, trimonthly, triweekly, weekly, yearly.

The more common suffix -ly]3 forms adjectives almost always from nouns: bankerly, beastly, beggarly, blackguardly, bodily, brotherly, churchly, churchmanly, citizenly, clerkly, costly, courtly, cousinly, cowardly, craftsmanly, creaturely, dancerly, daughterly, deathly, disorderly, doctorly, earthly, easterly, elderly, fatherly, fleshly, friarly, friendly, gentlemanly, ghastly (from a stem related to ghost), ghostly, gingerly, godly, goodly, grandfatherly, grandmotherly, grisly (from a verb stem meaning “to fear, shudder”), heavenly, homely, hostly, housewifely, humanly, kindly, kingly, knightly, landlubberly, lawyerly, likely, lively, lonely, lonelyhearts, lordly, lovely, loverly, lubberly, maidenly, manly, mannerly, masterly, matronly, miserly, motherly, neighborly, netherworldly, northeasterly, northerly, northwesterly, only, orderly, otherworldly, painterly, patricianly, portly, priestly, princely, queenly, rascally, ruffianly, sailorly, saintly, scholarly, schoolmasterly, seemly (from a Norse stem meaning “fitting”), shapely, sickly, sicklying, sightly, sisterly, slovenly, sluggardly, soldierly, sonly, southeasterly, southerly, southwesterly, spinsterly, sportsmanly, sprightly, squirrelly, stately, statesmanly, summerly, surly (related to sir), teacherly, timely, ugly (from a Norse stem meaning “fear”), unearthly, unfriendly, ungainly (from a Norse stem meaning, among other things, “direct”), ungodly, unkindly, unlikely, unlovely, unmanly, unmannerly, unneighborly, unseemly, unsightly, untimely, unwomanly, unworldly, weakly, weatherly, westerly, wifely, wizardly, womanly, worldly, writerly.

I’m not sure how to respond to your question about stress in tactical strings, except to say that as I define strings, the first vowel is always assumed to be stressed. The one exception to this is the V.V string (two vowels separated by a syllable boundary, as in lion) in which the first vowel is long whether or not it is stressed. If this doesn’t provide what you want to know, try again, with a bit more detail.

And, by the way, you’re welcome.

  cummings, spell, spelling, english, words, spellers, teachers, reading, read, reader
cummings, spell, spelling, english, words, spellers, teachers, reading, read, reader