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Why is it spelled...?

why is asthma spelled that way and not just 'asma'???
The word asthma comes ultimately from a Greek word meaning “to pant, to breathe hard” and spelled <asthma> (though in Greek letters, of course: alpha, sigma, theta, mu, alpha). In earlier English, it was usually spelled <asma> or <asmy>, the <th> having fallen silent. Notice how hard it is to get that [th] sound in there after the [z] sound. In the 16th century, when English writers respelled several words to indicate their Latin or Greek sources, the <th> got put back in, making it exactly like the Greek source, in spelling if not in sound. In some dictionaries in the 17th century, the <th> was pronounced [t], as it is in words like Thames and Thomas, the [t] sound being easier to pronounce after the [z] than is the [th] sound. But in time people just gave up trying to pronounce the <th>, and we have the unusual pronunciation that we have today. Notice that the same thing holds in the word isthmus, with the voiceless [s] sound rather than the voiced [z].
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cummings, spell, spelling, english, words, spellers, teachers, reading, read, reader