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Has English ever committed a Capital crime in raping other languages of vocabulary?

I’m sure it’s not a capital offense, and clearly not rape, though ransacking might come close, for English has adopted and adapted thousands of words from other languages. Of course, since all modern languages have evolved from earlier ones, you could say that all words (except for rare pure inventions) are all taken from other languages – and most recent inventions are based on bits and pieces from earlier languages.

In the 8500+ English word database I use at home there are words descended from 27 different languages. The vast majority come from languages in the Indo-European family of languages, which is the family to which English itself belongs:

The most common source is Latin, either directly or by way of French or one of the other Indo-European languages, like Spanish and Italian, that descend from Latin: Words from Latin by way of French: 2100. Words from Latin by way of other Romance languages (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Provencal): 118. Words directly from Latin: 644. All of these words, plus a few others, are from the Italic branch of the Indo-European family tree.

There are 2298 words from Old English, which are nearly all from the Germanic branch of the Indo-European family. Notice that there are more words from the Italic Latin (2862) than there are from the Germanic Old English (2298), even though English is itself a Germanic language.

There are a few non-Indo-European words, all from the Semitc language family, including 51 words from Hebrew, Arabic, and Akkadian.

Word lineages can get quite lengthy – for instance, that for sugar is “Sanskrit > Prakrit > Persian > Arabic > Italian > Latin > French”. (Sanskrit and Prakrit were ancient languages of India, also from Indo-European.) So the ransacking goes on all over the place.

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cummings, spell, spelling, english, words, spellers, teachers, reading, read, reader