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cummings, spell, spelling, english, words, spellers, teachers, reading, read, reader cummings, spell, spelling, english, words, spellers, teachers, reading, read, reader
 
cummings, spell, spelling, english, words, spellers, teachers, reading, read, reader cummings, spell, spelling, english, words, spellers, teachers, reading, read, reader

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Give students a hint when to use ph and when to use f in words with ef sound. Please reply Thank you
The first help is that when spelling [f] the <f> spelling is way more common than is <ph>. The <ph> spelling occurs mainly in words from Greek or Hebrew and most commonly in the following few bases: phot+, phys+, +phile, phone, +phobe, sphere, graph, soph+, as in photograph, physical, audiophile, phone, claustrophobe, sphere, graph, sophomore. Usually <ph> occurs at the beginning of words or at least at the beginning of elements within words. Unlike <f> it commonly accepts a preceding <s>, so the <sph> spelling is much more common and English–looking than is <sf>. And some words have two accepted spellings — for instance, fantom, phantom; frenetic, phrenetic; raffia, raphia; sulfur, sulphur.

I apologize for the lateness of this response: I did not realize we had a problem forwarding questions from the webpage to my home computer. Thus the delay. Sorry. I hope the response is still useful.

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cummings, spell, spelling, english, words, spellers, teachers, reading, read, reader