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Why is it spelled...?

If a goose are geese, why isn't a moose meese?
Old English had more than one way of showing that nouns were plural. Some took suffixes with <s>, as we most commonly do today. Some took suffixes with <n> and <r>, echoed in modern oxen, with -en, and in children, actually a double plural with both -r and -en. Another small group of nouns took endings that over time mutated, or changed, the vowel of the stem. This mutation was a kind of assimilation in which the stem vowel changed to be more like the vowel in the plural ending. Some of these Old English nouns survive today as man, men; woman, women; mouse, mice; louse, lice; foot, feet; tooth, teeth; and goose, geese. Moose, on the other hand, did not come from Old English. It is a North American Indian word and thus did not go through that Old English mutation in its plural. But unlike most adopted words, moose does not take -s or -es to form its plural. Instead, like the names of other gregarious animals, such as deer and elk, it uses the same form for both singular and plural.
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