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Yeah, I have a question! What is the root of the words "break ninety" and when are you going to do it? A golfing partner.
To answer such a question could easily involve a long discourse on the evolution of a word's meaning over the centuries because of the need to cope with ever-changing referential contexts via metaphoric and metonymic expansion -- but, being a gentle creature, I offer only the following: In the Oxford English Dictionary the earliest recorded use of break is in a line from a 10th century Old English translation of Psalm ii.9, which becomes in the King James Version something eerily like scenes we know from the golf course: "Thou shalt break them with a rod of iron; thou shalt dash them in pieces like a potter's vessel." Back then it had the original sense "To sever into distinct parts by sudden application of force, to part by violence." Notice that the notion of violence is still relevant to our golf matches. By the late 19th century break came to be used in the cricket term "to break one's duck('s egg)," meaning "to score one's first run in an innings, thus avoiding a duck's egg." That may or may not have been a bridge to the later sense of "to better a record or score," as in this familiar 20th century golfing quote, "Up to that hole he had an excellent chance to break a hundred." All of which brings us to the question of when I'm going to break ninety. The answer is that I already have, but I realized that it dismayed and embarrassed my golfing partners so much that I decided not to do it anymore (gentilesse again). At least not till I play with a higher grade of golfers.
  cummings, spell, spelling, english, words, spellers, teachers, reading, read, reader
cummings, spell, spelling, english, words, spellers, teachers, reading, read, reader