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give me some examples of silent p at the end of words such as reciept
The only words I know with a silent <p> near the end like receipt are receipt itself and its inflected forms receipts, receipted, receipting. Usually in words that end <pt> both the <p> and the <t> are pronounced, as in script, precept, wept, tempt, etc. However, the <pt> spelling of [t] occurs at the front of several other words: Most of them come from Greek, where both the <p> and the <t> were pronounced: pterodactyl, ptisan, ptomaine, ptyxis are examples. You can find more by looking for words in an English dictionary that start with <pt>. The one non-Greek example that I know is ptarmigan, which was originally spelled with a simple <t>, but was respelled with <pt> due to the mistaken notion that it came from the Greek base pter, meaning “wing.”
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